It’s ok to be indecisive!: A guide to figuring out what you want

By Sophia Klymchuk, 2nd year Con-Ed French/Psych student

I like to think of my years in high school as one long wave of indecisiveness. I became a regular at the guidance counselor’s office, constantly making tweaks and changes to my course selection. One day, I wanted to be a nurse. The next day, I wanted to be an architect.

Today, I am at Queen’s University, in my second year of Concurrent Education, with a major in French. To this day, it still surprises me how I managed to make that decision concerning my future, but my indecisiveness still isn’t at rest! Several academic appointments later, and with one in the upcoming future, I already changed my major despite it being only my second year.

Yes, life has its curveballs, I still have my ultimate goal in mind: to one day become a teacher. I’m happy to say that every decision I make revolves around this final goal.

The point is, it’s okay to be indecisive when it comes to choosing a major. It may be overwhelming at times, but as long as you keep your goals and dreams in mind over the course of your decision-making, indecisiveness can be viewed as having an open mind.

Are you in first year? Use this as the year to seize every opportunity, to excel in all of your courses. Go to your professor’s office hours, they don’t bite. Talk to them, maybe you’ll discover something new about them, about the course material, or about yourself. They may even offer you some insight on the degree you may or may not wish to pursue. Continue to do so in your upper-years as well.

Are you interested in pursuing a specific major, or two? Or, are you not sure? Every faculty’s Department Student Council holds events to acquaint students with what the major has to offer within Queen’s, and beyond. Attend these events and view them as opportunities for learning, and in some cases, free snacks.

Do you feel like indecisiveness is still getting the best of you? Get involved, join some clubs, and make the best out of your experience here at Queen’s. Who knows? That one club that crossed your mind once or maybe twice may actually help you discover that your true passion lies in environmental sustainability, or in working with young children. Take these opportunities to not only keep yourself busy and to meet like-minded people, but to acquaint yourself with what you want from life. I joined the student docent program at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre this year, and my experience there inspires me to incorporate a visual arts-based approach into my future classrooms.

For some extra guidance, it’s always a good idea to consult the Queen’s Faculty of Arts and Science, where academic guidance can help you steer in the right direction. Or, if you end up in a situation where, like me, you are unhappy with your major, they will be happy to help you choose what’s best for you.

Most importantly, set long-term goals for yourself, and orient your decision-making around those goals. Keep a vision board in your room, or write them down in your agenda, or a place where you can always see them. Always have your goals nearby to keep yourself focused in those moments of indecision. I like to keep various quotes on teaching in places that are visible to me, like my phone’s lock screen or my coffee mug.

University can be stressful by itself, so you shouldn’t let uncertainty dictate your thought patterns. Take indecisiveness as an opportunity to learn, to grow, and to find out where your true interests lie.

 

Photo courtesy of Queen’s University under Flickr Creative Commons Attribution license 2.0