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Become a Bounce Back Facilitator! Deadline to apply is August 3.

Posted by on Jul 22, 2015 in Featured | Comments Off on Become a Bounce Back Facilitator! Deadline to apply is August 3.

Become a Bounce Back Facilitator! Deadline to apply is August 3.

It’s that time of year again! Bounce Back is now accepting applications from interested upper year students (3rd-year or above) in all faculties and schools for the 2015-16 program. As a Bounce Back Facilitator, you will help first-year Arts & Science students get back on track towards academic success while developing your own learning support and coaching skills! You can read more about the program and position responsibilities for Faculty of Arts & Science Facilitators here and Commerce, Engineering, and Nursing facilitators here. The deadline for applying is August 3, 2015. Inquiries about the program and the role can be forwarded to Cassandra de Bartok, Mentor Program Coordinator. Email:...

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New online appointment booking system!

Posted by on Jul 22, 2015 in Blog Post, Featured | Comments Off on New online appointment booking system!

New online appointment booking system!

We are very pleased to release our new online appointment booking system. You are now able to register on our system and directly book your own appointments with Learning Strategies and the Writing Centre, with automated reminders, confirmation emails and a convenient way of modifying and cancelling your own appointments at any time of day. We hope you will find this new system convenient and easy to use. Remember that both services offer appointments until the end of July! If you have any questions about using this new system, please email academic.success@queensu.ca. Happy...

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Academic success webinar for online students

Posted by on Jul 22, 2015 in Blog Post, Featured | Comments Off on Academic success webinar for online students

Academic success webinar for online students

Are you taking an online course this summer? Check out the Continuing and Distance Studies webinar on success in online learning, featuring one of our own (Caleigh Minshall, Learning Strategies Outreach Coordinator). The entire webinar is available online, and you’ll learn about academic success strategies from academic advisors, professors, and a current online student. The video is about an hour long. If you want the quick tips version, you can download this PDF summary instead. Distance students are also welcome to book a professional learning strategies appointment on the telephone. Simply visit our online booking system to find a time that works for your...

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Welcome, SOAR students and families!

Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in Blog Post, Featured | Comments Off on Welcome, SOAR students and families!

Welcome, SOAR students and families!

Whether you attend SOAR in-person, or whether you’ve found our website from afar, Learning Strategies welcomes you to Queen’s University. We can’t wait to meet you! In fact, if you’re on Twitter, you should tweet us to say hello! (We’re also on Facebook.) Here are our top four most useful resources about academic transition for Queen’s students and their families. And remember that these are all FREE to Queen’s students! 1. Download our online resources for first-year students, including the popular “Academics 101” PDF document. 2. Bookmark our workshop schedule on your web browser. We offer interactive workshops during the fall and winter, including a great one entitled “Making the Grade: From High School to University.”  While you won’t be able to register until Orientation Week, it’s good to see what’s available before you arrive on campus. 3. Watch “Leveling Up: How to think smart at university,” a short video that explores different levels of thinking. Memory does not mean comprehension! Learn what level of thinking your professor expects and how you can study to meet that level. 4. If you’re a parent or family member, visit our Parents page to learn about how you can support your student while they’re at university and what other resources are available to you. You can also learn more about Learning Strategies, our staff, our volunteers, and Student Academic Success Services as a whole. Cha Gheill! Queen’s umbrella photo courtesy of Queen’s University under Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic...

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Spring/Summer hours

Posted by on Apr 16, 2015 in Featured | Comments Off on Spring/Summer hours

Spring/Summer hours

Schedule a 1:1 session with a learning strategist or professional writing consultant this summer! We can provide support for essays, dissertation and other grad-related writing, English language learner issues (including presentation and academic language skills sessions), or issues with motivation, time management, procrastination, and managing academic stress. Learning Strategies: May 4 – July 30 Appointments are generally available Monday – Friday afternoons, 1:30 – 3:30. The Writing Centre: April 27 – July 30 Appointments are generally available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, from 12:30 – 3:30. We also have appointments available Monday, April 27 and Monday, May 11. To book a learning strategies advising appointment or a professional writing consultation, call 613-533-6315 or visit our front desk on the ground floor of Stauffer Library (north back corner). We look forward to working with you this...

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How to tackle exam season

Posted by on Apr 2, 2015 in Blog Post, Featured | Comments Off on How to tackle exam season

How to tackle exam season

I say this every year, but this semester really did just fly by. I cannot believe that we are already at the end of Week 12. Exam season is here and it’s time to get down to the nitty-gritty. This also applies to those bogged down by final assignments or essays. Let’s not procrastinate — instead think “game on!” The time to start is now. Try not to fumble Falling behind in your classes can happen sometimes, and the sense of losing control can heighten when exams loom ahead. The best way to counter exam anxiety is to manage your time well and take care of yourself. Taking time to exercise is beneficial, even if it’s as little as 30 minutes a day. It is equally important to eat healthy meals, have some fun, and get enough sleep. Give yourself breaks as meeting your basic needs is the first step. You will feel better and this will translate to more productive study sessions. Getting to the end zone It is important to start early and determine how many hours you will need to prepare for each exam. Then, try allocating sufficient study time for each exam. A great way to do so is by using an Exam Study Schedule template. It’s very customizable, and check out the back for instructions! Within each study session, try implementing the 50:10 rule. This means study for 50 minutes and then take a 10-inute break. Another helpful thing to do is to make the schedule as routine as possible. For instance, try to wake up, study, and go to bed the same time each day. Touchdown! There is no better feeling than walking into an exam feeling prepared. Well… There is one thing — and that’s being done all your exams! We’re almost there! Try your best to stick to your study schedule and spread your work over as many days as possible. Here’s the April Exam Study Schedule for this exam season. Good luck! Photo courtesy of COD Newsroom under Flickr Creative Commons Attribution license...

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5 ways to be AWESOME this exam period!

Posted by on Mar 25, 2015 in Blog Post, Featured | Comments Off on 5 ways to be AWESOME this exam period!

5 ways to be AWESOME this exam period!

By Grace McCabe, 4th-year English major Well, folks, it’s that time of year again…that time in the semester when you are scrambling to get multiple assignments and final papers completed, keep up with readings and all the while, you have that nagging voice in the back of your mind that’s telling you, “You better start getting ready for exams!” How are you supposed to keep it all together at such a busy time? Here are a few tips on how you can start getting ready for final exams at this point in the semester: 1. Get the big picture If you haven’t already made a calendar that lets you see all your due dates and exam dates, now is the time to do so. By looking at all of your deadlines, you can start to make an exam study schedule and this will carry you from the last week of classes straight into exam period. Organization at this time of year (and all year) is key, and a calendar will help you manage your time. 2. Make a study schedule Speaking of calendars…The Peer Learning Assistants give out the most AMAZING April Exam Study Schedules, and it just so happens that we are giving them away this Friday! This template is golden! Stop by Stauffer Room 121 and let the PLA’s show you this awesome study tool! I promise, you will be excited to plan your study time with this schedule! 3. Make a plan Now that you have your study schedule, you can start planning what you need to do and when. The sooner you start gathering your lecture notes, or the sooner you start those final lab reports, assignments, and essays, the better. I know you hear this from your profs, TA’s and parents ALL the time, but it’s the best way to prevent yourself from getting stuck in a time crunch at the end of the semester or exam period and will help avoid cramming. Speaking from experience, starting a 10-page research paper 3 day before its due is no fun at all. Start early, my friends! Avoid extra stress at all costs! 4. Manage your stress While we’re on the topic of stress, it is crucial that you take care of yourself during this time. When making your study schedule, make sure you are including breaks for things like exercise (hopefully some warmer weather will make going outside for a walk an option soon!), having dinner with a friend, going grocery shopping or doing laundry. Plan for the little things and make sure you are tending to personal needs. Schedule in bedtime too! Sleep is your best friend, especially during exams! Stay healthy and try to minimize extra stress by doing things for yourself. 5. Think positive thoughts In the midst of the chaos and craziness of the last few weeks of the semester, it’s important to motivate yourself in any way possible. A few ways to do that are by using positive self-talk. Say out loud to yourself, “I can do this. I am prepared. I did really good work today!” Be kind and gentle to yourself! Keep those positive thoughts flowing to help you get through this busy period! I am closing this blog post with a quote I came across the other...

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Training for the marathon (AKA university)

Posted by on Mar 23, 2015 in Blog Post, Featured | Comments Off on Training for the marathon (AKA university)

Training for the marathon (AKA university)

By Caleigh Treissman, 3rd-year Psychology major University is a marathon: the workload is large and the timeline is tight, but in order to succeed you must be able to keep up your endurance. An important way to build up the endurance to last throughout the race (your university degree) is by taking breaks (yes, you read that right, BREAKS!). Use the 50/10 rule: Try to break your study time into 50-minute sessions with a 10-minute break between sessions. Give this a try! It will help improve your concentration and keep your momentum up! Here are a few great break ideas: Go for a walk, Talk with a friend, Stretch, Eat a healthy meal, and BREATHE! Remember that taking breaks will make you more motivated and efficient as you continue on! They are an important part of making your experience (be that a marathon, or a university degree) manageable and fun! You may have noticed those people on the side of the marathon route that hand out water and encourage people to take a quick break before continuing on. The Peer Learning Assistants are those people in your University marathon! Remember that we are here to help you succeed. Attend one of our Exam Prep workshops this term to learn more. Photo courtesy of Robert Couse-Baker under Flickr Creative Commons Attribution license...

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The last ten yards: Catching up before finals

Posted by on Mar 17, 2015 in Blog Post, Featured | Comments Off on The last ten yards: Catching up before finals

The last ten yards: Catching up before finals

By Theresa Bryce, 4th-year English major and Gender Studies minor It’s week 10 and final papers, assignments, labs, and exams are right around the corner and you haven’t done readings… ironically since reading week! It might not be easy to catch up but I hope these strategies will guide you and relieve some stress as you make your way into the summer! Once you’ve fallen behind I always hear friends and students ask “Should I start from the week I stopped doing readings? Won’t I fall behind on what’s happening now?”. The short answer is that it is possible you may fall behind on current work. The hard truth is that now you have to try make up those hours of Netflix, Stages, procrasti-cleaning/cooking over the past few weeks! Where to begin? This depends on your course. If the course is cumulative and teaches material that builds on earlier units (like physics, for example), you’ll have to start from where you stopped. If your course isn’t cumulative, you might try starting with where you’ve stopped, but also attending class and doing the current week’s work (so scheduling in “catch-up” and “keep-up” time into your schedule). To catch up, calculate how much time you have left in the term and double up: do two weeks’ worth of work in one! Decreasing your work load I know, doing two weeks in one is exhausting. To reduce the amount of studying, look for main themes, topics, or concepts in your course syllabus. Use “Learning Objectives” to guide what information is important. It might seem like it’s all important, but focusing your energy into the main ideas of the course will yield better results than knowing all the details of weeks 1 and 2 while letting the rest of the course fall to the wayside. Another way to decrease your work load is to visit your professor and/or TA. It might be daunting to visit office hours, but as a fourth year let me remind you that professors are people, too. They get lonely in their offices and want to see students. They also know that university is hard. Be honest about where you are in the course so that they can direct you the best they can. Worried about what to say? Here are some guided statements or questions to say to your professor: “I have really fallen behind on the course work. What is the best way to learn the main themes or concepts from each week? “ “Should I focus on online, text or lectures notes?” “These concepts really confuse me: __________. “ Positive Self Talk Catching up is tough, but it’s even harder when that little voice inside your head keeps telling you “I can’t do this”, “I don’t have enough time”, or “This is impossible”. Shut down that negative inner voice! You are where you are — it’s time to make the best of the time you have left. Create a goal using the wise choice model. Dream big: what is the mark or grade you wish to achieve? Assess the situation: What do you need to do to achieve this goal (remember the tips to decrease your work load*) Develop a Creator Perspective: Speak in positive and specific terms I WILL do this. I WILL feel like...

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University is a balancing act

Posted by on Mar 11, 2015 in Blog Post, Featured | Comments Off on University is a balancing act

University is a balancing act

By Jordanna Grossinger, 4th-year Concurrent Education student studying French and Psychology Time flies when you’re having fun… We’ve all heard that before and my last four years at Queen’s are definitive proof of this oh-so-famous statement. Between all of our social commitments, academic responsibilities and extra-curricular activities, university turns into one big balancing act that’s often hard to manage. At the beginning of the year we find ourselves organizing our to-do lists, making fresh (maybe colour-coded!) schedules and committing to study skills we’ve been taught about over the years… But as always, life tends to get in the way. Despite our best efforts, things come up, readings fall to the way side and before you know it, it’s already March! Yes, I said it, the dreaded month of March. With assignments piling up and finals around the corner, you may set into panic, wondering how everything is going to get done in time. Well, I’m here to tell you that you’re not alone! There is still time to make meaningful changes and finish off the year strong. Here are some study tips and tricks to help you keep up and catch up with your work the rest of the term: Get in the right head space. There’s no time for ‘should-coulda-woulda’s. Forget all things you think you could have done better or what you wished you’d have done earlier in the term – you are here now and you have to do what you have to do. Time to make a plan and get to work! Make a to-do list. Take time to write down everything you need to get done. Try to include the things you’ve missed and the things you need to catch up on. The long list may look scary at first, but prioritize what needs to get first based on upcoming due dates or material covered on upcoming tests. Make a plan. Based on your to-do list, create a schedule for yourself with specific goals to work on at specific times. It might be helpful to use the day to “keep up” with class (work on current material) and evenings or weekends to “catch up” on missed material. Our weekly schedule is a great tool to plan out all of your work and activities for the week. Use your resources. Use the learning objectives (found in your syllabus) to help guide your studying. If you’re short on time, don’t sweat the small stuff – instead, focus on the main ideas listed in the objectives. Also don’t forget to ask your professors and TA’s for clarification or help in targeting your readings. Make studying fun! Just because it may feel like crunch time, try to make the best of your study time. Enjoy your study time by working in study groups with friends, creating fun summary sheets and finding new study spots on campus. Good luck with the rest of the term! You’ve got this! Photo courtesy of rosmary under Flickr Creative Commons Attribution license...

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