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Books don’t kill my vibe

By Tanveen Rai, 3rd year Biology/Psyc student

The third week of school has officially begun. And for some of us this week means serious catch up. There are lectures to attend, assignments to do, tests to take, and of course textbooks to read. I honestly can’t believe how fast time is going. How I wish I could make it stop (at least for a little while).

The most time consuming and quite frankly boring task for me are my readings. I HATE READING TEXTBOOKS! So how do I really feel you ask… But I am learning how to make this whole process a lot more enjoyable.

A few tips from me to you:

  • Make a schedule and designate when you will read what. Try to stay on top of it. Just remember going home to a chapter to read versus a stack of books is a lot less stressful.
  • Read for 50 minutes then walk away for 10. Take a break, because you deserve it! Giving yourself even just ten minutes to relax will help you concentrate better.
  • Get in the mood! The material will be more interesting if you want to read it. This is easy to do for classes you enjoy but even if you don’t like the class pretend you do. I know you’re probably thinking I’m crazy but trust me it works.
  • Scan the chapter first. Look at the subtitles, summaries, bold or italicized words, and figures to get a general idea of what you will be reading about. This will allow you to have something to build on when you actually start reading.
  • Read with a purpose. I have a problem with zoning out when I read. I’ll read something and then two seconds later not remember what I just read. Instead of rereading the same page a hundred times engage in active learning by asking yourself Questions as you read.
  • Review the chapter. I bet you thought you were already done! Not quite. After reading the material you need to scan it again and make sure you understood everything. This is the only way to get one up on your textbook!

And if you really want to show the book its place, you’ll review the chapter again in a day or two [editor’s note: this moves the information into your long-term memory so you don’t forget everything in a month!]. It’s not so bad. “I got my [coffee], I got my [books]/ I would share it but today I’m yelling/ [Books] don’t kill my vibe!”

For more information about reading and retaining textbook information, visit our Reading and Notetaking module.

Photo courtesy of Kamal H. from Flickr Creative Commons.

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When learning takes a backseat: rethinking the practicality of bird courses

By Dorothy Yu, 4th year Psychology student

Disclaimer: This is entirely my own opinion; feel free to agree or disagree. I’d love to hear any constructive critiques though, so feel free to comment below!

Taking a look at the Queen’s-related Facebook groups on my sidebar, the following three groups stand out in terms of popularity:

  • Overheard at Queen’s – 10, 699 members
  • Free and For Sale – 8, 996 members
  • “Must knows” for courses at Queen’s – 5, 236 members

What does this tell us about Queen’s students?

  1. We have great school spirit and a tight-knit community of students who love to share funny and wonderful things about their school with each other, as well as occasionally bond over their shared fear of mutant squirrels.
  2. We like to make money and get freebies. Who doesn’t?
  3. We care about our courses and doing well in them.

Now, all these things are important and natural things to care about. In particular, we’re ultimately at school to go to class, and we go to university to learn, don’t we?

Or do we?

What I find interesting is the massive number of posts on “Must knows” posing the following question in various iterations:

 “Can anyone recommend me some bird courses?”

 Bird course (n): an easy course in university. Usually taken to lighten one’s workload; an easy A+. Actual interest in the subject optional.

Now, I’m not at all saying there’s anything wrong with wanting to take an easy elective, or boost your GPA. I understand that med/law/grad schools take into account your grades, and sometimes people really need one or two ridiculously easy courses to help get the grades they need, especially when they’re also taking a bunch of other ridiculously difficult courses. Unfortunately there are few buffers in place in admissions processes to account for course difficulty, but that’s an entirely separate discussion for another day.

What concerns me isn’t so much the desire for good grades, but rather when the desire for good grades trumps the desire to learn.

It’s practical, and some would even say necessary, to balance out those “GPA killer” courses with subjects with a lighter workload that are easier to excel in. But I think what we often forget is that GPA should be a consideration, but shouldn’t be the sole criterion for course selection. After all, don’t we come to university to broaden our horizons? To study a certain subject more in depth? To learn something new?

The purpose of this piece isn’t at all to pass judgment on those who choose to take easier courses, or base their course decisions on level of difficulty. I myself have often worried about a course’s notorious reputation, and even posted in “Must knows” requesting grade distributions and insights into various classes. For some, taking a bird course might actually be the right and most sensible decision – maybe they need to work more that semester to pay for tuition, maybe there’s a medical situation that requires attention, maybe they’re just finding that they need more time to do well and don’t have the time to commit fully to five courses. Maybe the subject of that bird course truly interests you. Maybe it doesn’t. That’s okay. You are the best judge of what kind of workload you can handle, and it’s important to take note of those instincts. All I’m saying is, in the coming week as you finalize your courses, before you hit that enroll button, consider: Does this truly interest me? Am I going to enjoy this course? And, most importantly, am I going to learn this semester?

If the answer is no, maybe reconsider. Take something that isn’t necessarily an easy A+ but rather something you love. Don’t be afraid to challenge yourself. The number one motivator is interest, and if you love something the work won’t even feel like work – it’ll just feel like learning. And when you’re learning, the grades will come naturally.

Featured image from Flickr Creative Commons, taken by Jerine.

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Create your own weekly schedule

Use the Learning Strategies Weekly schedule template to create your own weekly schedule.

Creating your own weekly schedule will help you

  • keep up with homework, assignments, and studying, so that things don’t pile up
  • feel confident, rather than overwhelmed, about your workload
  • maintain a balanced life while at Queen’s

It’s simple:

  • Write in fixed commitments (classes, work, appointments and meetings) then healthy habits (eat, sleep, and physical activity).
  • Estimate the number of weekly homework hours you need, and outline your best learning times (1-3 hour blocks) – these can be your homework times.
  • Adjust your weekly schedule as often as needed, so that this schedule works for you!

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